The Resilient Earth

CO2 for the last 15 or so million of years (with more certainty 800,000 years): ~ 285 ppm
CO2 for last reading in March 2015: 401 ppm: http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/ccgg/trends/
The trend is that this pattern (of increasing CO2) has accelerated in the last 30 years…we know atmosphere doesn’t react right away to this amount of greenhouse gases because there is a lag of ~ 20 years. We also know there has been a ~.8 C warming in the same period. Oceans absorb 97% of the warming and up to 30% of the CO2, this all indicates that there is a big likelihood that  the warming will show up (accelerate) in the coming years at a really fast rate: we have never had that warming nor that amount of CO2 in the world at least since human beings have been here.
33% of soils are lost to erosion or pollution: http://www.fao.org/fileadmin/user_upload/soils-2015/docs/EN/IYS_fact_sheets_preservation_en_PRINT.pd…

Modeling Ice Age’s End Lessens Climate Change Worries
by Doug L. Hoffman on Wed, 07/22/2009 – 14:31

Two articles in the July 17 edition of Science describe efforts to model Earth’s rapidly changing climate at the end of the last glacial period, between 21 and 11 thousand years years ago (ka). After a year and a half of number crunching on Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Jaguar supercomputer, the first results indicate that climate experienced cooling 17 ka, during the Heinrich Event 1 (H1), followed by an abrupt warming at the onset of the Bølling-Allerød Warming 14.5 ka. These abrupt climate changes were accompanied by large changes in the “ocean conveyor belt”: the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). The results suggest that this transition can be viewed simply as the North Atlantic climate response to rapidly changing glacial meltwater flow. The findings call for a paradigm shift in our understanding of abrupt climate change and weakens the threat of “irreversible tipping points” so popular with climate change extremists.

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About arnulfo

veterano del ciberespacio
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