Global biofuel production

A biofuel is a fuel that is produced through contemporary biological processes, such as agriculture and anaerobic digestion, rather than a fuel produced by geological processes such as those involved in the formation of fossil fuels, such as coal and petroleum, from prehistoric biological matter. Biofuels can be derived directly from plants, or indirectly from agricultural, commercial, domestic, and/or industrial wastes.[1] Renewable biofuels generally involve contemporary carbon fixation, such as those that occur in plants or microalgae through the process ofphotosynthesis. Other renewable biofuels are made through the use or conversion of biomass (referring to recently living organisms, most often referring to plants or plant-derived materials). This biomass can be converted to convenient energy containing substances in three different ways: thermal conversion, chemical conversion, and biochemical conversion. This biomass conversion can result in fuel in solid, liquid, or gas form. This new biomass can also be used directly for biofuels.

Bioethanol is an alcohol made by fermentation, mostly from carbohydratesproduced in sugar or starch crops such as corn, sugarcane, or sweet sorghum.Cellulosic biomass, derived from non-food sources, such as trees and grasses, is also being developed as a feedstock for ethanol production. Ethanol can be used as a fuel for vehicles in its pure form, but it is usually used as a gasolineadditive to increase octane and improve vehicle emissions. Bioethanol is widely used in the USA and in Brazil. Current plant design does not provide for converting the lignin portion of plant raw materials to fuel components by fermentation.

Biodiesel can be used as a fuel for vehicles in its pure form, but it is usually used as a diesel additive to reduce levels of particulates, carbon monoxide, andhydrocarbons from diesel-powered vehicles. Biodiesel is produced from oils or fats using transesterification and is the most common biofuel in Europe.

In 2010, worldwide biofuel production reached 105 billion liters (28 billion gallons US), up 17% from 2009,[2] and biofuels provided 2.7% of the world’s fuels for road transport, a contribution largely made up of ethanol and biodiesel.[citation needed] Global ethanol fuel production reached 86 billion liters (23 billion gallons US) in 2010, with the United States and Brazil as the world’s top producers, accounting together for 90% of global production. The world’s largest biodiesel producer is the European Union, accounting for 53% of all biodiesel production in 2010.[2] As of 2011, mandates for blending biofuels exist in 31 countries at the national level and in 29 states or provinces.[3] The International Energy Agency has a goal for biofuels to meet more than a quarter of world demand for transportation fuels by 2050 to reduce dependence on petroleum and coal.[4] The production of biofuels also led into a flourishing automotive industry, where by 2010, 79% of all cars produced in Brazil were made with a hybrid fuel system of bioethanol and gasoline.[5]

There are various social, economic, environmental and technical issues relating to biofuels production and use, which have been debated in the popular media and scientific journals. These include: the effect of moderating oil prices, the “food vs fuel” debate, poverty reduction potential, carbon emissions levels, sustainable biofuel production, deforestation and soil erosion, loss of biodiversity, impact on water resources, rural social exclusion and injustice, shantytown migration, rural unskilled unemployment, and nitrous oxide (NO2) emissions.


Global biofuel production would use limited farmland more efficiently if the biomass were converted into electricity to power electric cars rather than refined into ethanol, a new analysis finds.

The findings, published last week in the journal Science, suggest that transportation policies in the United States and Europe that seek to address climate change may allow vehicles to travel farther and offset more greenhouse gas emissions if biomass resources were used to charge electric vehicles. Instead, current biofuel production mandatessupport the conversion of biomass feedstocks into ethanol or biodiesel.

The Efficiency Of Biodiesel Fuel

The use of Biodiesel fuel for standard diesel engines, either alone or in combination with other fuels, has gathered much attention mostly because of its possible environmental and long-term economical benefits over fossil fuel. The efficiency of biodiesel fuel is the more interesting subject for the researchers and scientists, mainly because its source is renewable. Read on to know more on biodiesel fuel efficiency.

About arnulfo

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