happiness and positive thinking

The Science of Character (8 mins) explores the neuroscience and social science that proves that we can shape who we are, and who we want to be. The film was part of the global Character Day 2015 (Sept 18). Millions of people participated in the day, with screenings in over 6700 classrooms, schools and organizations, a global online Q&A, and online discussion materials to catalyze deeper conversations about character development.

Published on Jun 23, 2013

Most of us think we know what would make us happy and that our only problem is getting it. But research in psychology, behavioral economics, and cognitive neuroscience shows that people are not very good at predicting what will make them happy, how happy it will make them, and how long that happiness will last. One reason for this is that our cultures provide us with both wisdom and myth about the true sources of human happiness.


Uploaded on Dec 17, 2008

http://www.ted.com Dan Gilbert presents research and data from his exploration of happiness — sharing some surprising tests and experiments that you can also try on yourself.


Published on Mar 13, 2013

Oliver Burkeman, winner of the Foreign Press Association Young Journalist of the Year Award, explores “happiness for people who can’t stand positive thinking” in his best-selling book The Antidote: Happiness for People Who Can’t Stand Positive Thinking.

Burkeman says “For a civilization so fixated on achieving happiness, we seem remarkably incompetent at the task. Self-help books don’t seem to work. Few of the many advantages of modern life seem capable of lifting our collective mood. Wealth — even if you can get it — doesn’t necessarily lead to happiness. Romance, family life and work often seem to bring as much stress as joy. We can’t even agree on what ‘happiness’ means”.

Oliver Burkeman seeks answers from an unusual collection of people — experimental psychologists and Buddhists, terrorism experts, spiritual teachers, business consultants, philosophers — who share a single, surprising way of thinking about life. They argue that ‘positive thinking’ and relentless optimism aren’t the solution, but part of the problem. And that there is an alternative, ‘negative path’ to happiness and success that involves embracing failure, pessimism, insecurity and uncertainty — those things we spend our lives trying to avoid. Thought provoking, counterintuitive and ultimately uplifting, The Antidote is a celebration of the power of negative thinking.

New York based Burkeman, is a regular contributor to The Guardian. His work has also appeared in Esquire, Elle, GQ, the Observer and the New Republic. He holds a degree in Social and Political Sciences from Cambridge University.

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