“Integrity vs. Despair”

Voices from the Margins

Carol A. Hand

The mean(ingless)-stream media circus continues
Celebrating the latest ignorance and cruelty
Seas, air and land poisoned by hubris and greed
Drones and bombs shredding lives and livelihoods
Millions of refugees searching for shelter
I feel the earth crying out to awaken our hearts
It’s more than enough to foster sorrow and hopelessness

***

crouching child

***

As a woman of little importance I still have a choice
to resist that temptation
for the sake of my grandchildren and yours
As a simple teacher and storyteller I can give voice
to the suffering and wisdom of my ancestors
to the fleeting fragile beauty present, now, everywhere
to clear visions of the peaceful world that could yet be

***

***

Each one of us who resists despair
adds a bit of light to the world

***

Note:

The title, “integrity vs. despair” is drawn from Erik Erikson’s theory on…

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with luck, balls are better than brains

Christopher Columbus (c. 31 October 1451 – 20 May 1506) was an explorer, colonizer, and navigator, born in the Republic of Genoa, in what is today northwestern Italy.[2][3][4][5] Under the auspices of the Catholic Monarchs of Spain, he completed four voyages across the Atlantic Ocean that led to general European awareness of the American continents in the Western Hemisphere. Those voyages, and his efforts to establish permanent settlements in the island of Hispaniola, initiated the process of Spanish colonization, which foreshadowed the general European colonization of the “New World“.

In the context of emerging western imperialism and economic competition between European kingdoms seeking wealth through the establishment of trade routes and colonies, Columbus’ far-fetched proposal to reach the East Indies by sailing westward received the support of the Spanish crown, which saw in it a promise, however remote, of gaining the upper hand over rival powers in the contest for the lucrative spice trade with Asia. During his first voyage in 1492, instead of reaching Japan as he had intended, Columbus landed in the Bahamas archipelago, at a locale he named San Salvador. Over the course of three more voyages, Columbus visited the Greater and Lesser Antilles, as well as the Caribbean coast of Colombia, Venezuela and Central America, claiming them for the Spanish Empire.

Never admitting that he had reached a continent previously unknown to Europeans, rather than the East Indies he had set out for, Columbus called the inhabitants of the lands he visited indios (Spanish for “Indians“).[7][8][9] Columbus’ strained relationship with the Spanish crown and its appointed colonial administrators in America led to his arrest and dismissal as governor of the settlements in Hispaniola in 1500, and later to protracted litigation over the benefits which Columbus and his heirs claimed were owed to them by the crown.

Washington Irving‘s 1828 biography of Columbus popularized the idea that Columbus had difficulty obtaining support for his plan because many Catholic theologians insisted that the Earth was flat.[25] In fact, most educated Westerners had understood that the Earth was spherical at least since the time of Aristotle, who lived in the 4th century BC and whose works were widely studied and revered in Medieval Europe.[26] The sphericity of the Earth is also accounted for in the work of Ptolemy, on which ancient astronomy was largely based. Christian writers whose works clearly reflect the conviction that the Earth is spherical include Saint Bede the Venerable in his Reckoning of Time, written around AD 723. In Columbus’ time, the techniques of celestial navigation, which use the position of the Sun and the Stars in the sky, together with the understanding that the Earth is a sphere, were widely used by mariners.

Where Columbus did differ from the view accepted by scholars in his day was in his estimate of the westward distance from Europe to Asia. Columbus’ ideas in this regard were based on three factors: his low estimate of the size of the Earth, his high estimate of the size of the Eurasian landmass, and his belief that Japan and other inhabited islands lay far to the east of the coast of China. In all three of these issues Columbus was both wrong and at odds with the scholarly consensus of his day.

As far back as the 3rd century BC, Eratosthenes had correctly computed the circumference of the Earth by using simple geometry and studying the shadows cast by objects at two different locations: Alexandria and Syene (modern-day Aswan).[27] Eratosthenes’s results were confirmed by a comparison of stellar observations at Alexandria and Rhodes, carried out by Posidonius in the 1st century BC. These measurements were widely known among scholars, but confusion about the old-fashioned units of distance in which they were expressed had led, in Columbus’s day, to some debate about the exact size of the Earth.


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Sources (Taken from the oatmeal via Anacephalaeosis) :

A People’s History of the United States, by Howard Zinn, and Lies My Teacher Told Me, by James W. Loewen.

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History Buffs: Dances with Wolves

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¿Cúal fue el primer lenguaje de programación?

Pagina de Luis Alejandro Guzman Busso

En 1946 Grace Hopper, cientifica en sistemas y oficial de la marina estadounidense creo el FLOW-MATIC, considerado el primer lenguage de computadora útil para resolver problemas de usuarios comerciales, especificamente para la computadora UNIVAC 1. Era ligeramente cercano al idioma inglés y visto como un lenguaje de ‘alto nivel’: fácil de usar por los programadores pero necesitaba ser traducido por otro programa (compilador) en un lenguaje que la computadora pudiera interpretar y llevar a cabo.

En 1957 la compañia IBM creó FORTRAN, lenguaje diseñado especificamente para uso científico. Su nombre proviene del ingles Formula-Translator, o traductor de fórmulas. Éste se convirtio en el primer lenguaje de programación de alto nivel para programadores disponible para programadores de espectro mas alto.

En 1958 surgió una versión mejorada llamada ALGOL (Algoritihmic Laguaje) y despues COBOL (Command Business Oriented Languaje); este ultimo se empleaba para organizar archivos y administrar bases de datos de negocios.

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Analytics para la Salud en México – Un reporte con actas de nacimiento y estadísticas vitales

This gallery contains 7 photos.

Originally posted on Blog de www.thedatlas.com:
Qué tal ¿Cómo están? El día de hoy les venimos a compartir algo que presentamos en el famosisimo Hackaton de Salud realizado por Hacking Health MX en el Tec de Monterrey el fin…

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Learning Emacs – part 1: Introduction, entering emacs, and exiting emacs

Blasphemous Bits

So I’ve decided to learn Emacs. I’ve always been more of a Vi man previously, and I still consider some moderate amount of comfort with Vi to be a necessity for any Unix sysadmin. I’ve also used a few of the major IDE’s for programming: I use Eclipse with RadRails for all of my Ruby development, a friend who’s trying to get me to learn Java has introduced me to NetBeans, and I’ve played a bit with C# in Visual Studio.

So why learn Emacs? Well, there are a so many people on the net who swear by Emacs, including some who otherwise seem to be very sensible and non-masochistic. 🙂 It’s also supposed to be the environment of choice for Lisp and Scheme programming, which is something I’d like to learn more about. So, operating under the principle that “where there’s smoke there may be fire”, I’m going to…

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Donald Trump

Fevered media speculation about Donald Trump’s psychological motivations and psychiatric diagnosis has recently encouraged mental health professionals to disregard the usual ethical constraints against diagnosing public figures at a distance. They have sponsored several petitions and a Feb. 14 letter to The New York Times suggesting that Mr. Trump is incapable, on psychiatric grounds, of serving as president.

Most amateur diagnosticians have mislabeled President Trump with the diagnosis of narcissistic personality disorder. I wrote the criteria that define this disorder, and Mr. Trump doesn’t meet them. He may be a world-class narcissist, but this doesn’t make him mentally ill, because he does not suffer from the distress and impairment required to diagnose mental disorder.

Mr. Trump causes severe distress rather than experiencing it and has been richly rewarded, rather than punished, for his grandiosity, self-absorption and lack of empathy. It is a stigmatizing insult to the mentally ill (who are mostly well behaved and well meaning) to be lumped with Mr. Trump (who is neither).

Bad behavior is rarely a sign of mental illness, and the mentally ill behave badly only rarely. Psychiatric name-calling is a misguided way of countering Mr. Trump’s attack on democracy. He can, and should, be appropriately denounced for his ignorance, incompetence, impulsivity and pursuit of dictatorial powers.

His psychological motivations are too obvious to be interesting, and analyzing them will not halt his headlong power grab. The antidote to a dystopic Trumpean dark age is political, not psychological.

ALLEN FRANCES

Coronado, Calif.

The writer, professor emeritus of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Duke University Medical College, was chairman of the task force that wrote the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV (D.S.M.-IV).

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Paulo Freire, grande educador Brasileiro. Baixar aqui o livro em pdf “Pedagogia do Oprimido”

Baixar o livro em pdf aqui:  Pedagogia_do_Oprimido_Paulo_Freire     Paulo Reglus Neves Freire (Recife, 19 de setembro de 1921 — São Paulo, 2 de maio de 1997) foi um educador, pedagogista …

Source: Paulo Freire, grande educador Brasileiro. Baixar aqui o livro em pdf “Pedagogia do Oprimido”

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Lots And Lots Of foldLeft Examples

Matt Malone's Old-Fashioned Software Development Blog

In my last post I reviewed the implementation of scala.List’s foldLeft and foldRight methods. That post included a couple of simple examples, but today I’d like to give you a whole lot more. The foldLeft method is extremely versatile. It can do thousands of jobs. Of course, it’s not the best tool for EVERY job, but when working on a list problem it’s a good idea to stop and think, “Should I be using foldLeft?”

Below, I’ll present a list of problem descriptions and solutions. I thought about listing all the problems first, and then the solutions, so the reader could work on his own solution and then scroll down to compare. But this would be very annoying for those who refuse, against my strenuous urging, to start up a Scala interpreter and try to write their own solution to each problem before reading my solution.

Sum

Write a function…

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Lofty Strangeness

“THE future ain’t what it used to be,” baseball’s Yogi Berra quipped, with trademark deadpan. Indeed, the emerging “new science” can be as unreadable as a deftly…

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